Thursday, October 15, 2015

I am so ashamed/ The Lightning Thief MMGM

Hello my fellow nerds and welcome to The Rad Reader! What is this, my third "I am so ashamed" post?

*hides behind bush*

Don't hurt me!
Anyways, as all human beings know, life gets in the way of things. Even if you have hardly any social life, like me. 
Many things have been going on lately, so I truly apologize for all the grueling hours you spent sobbing in your bed because I haven't blogged. 
Haha. Not.
Anyways, in all seriousness..... Pshh, when would I ever be serious? Ok, now I am getting sidetracked. I humbly beg for forgiveness (thanks, Google for that amazing synonym for apologies)! 
I'm just going to get that review started. Aaand..... roll tape! 
Ok one more thing. This review is for Percy Jackson: The Lightning Thief by Rick Riordan. I know, I know, most people have read this, but for some reason I have not until now.
*hides behind another bush*
Don't hurt me!


Goodreads says:

Percy Jackson is a good kid, but he can't seem to focus on his schoolwork or control his temper. And lately, being away at boarding school is only getting worse—Percy could have sworn his pre-algebra teacher turned into a monster and tried to kill him. When Percy's mom finds out, she knows it's time that he knew the truth about where he came from, and that he go to the one place he'll be safe. She sends Percy to Camp Half Blood, a summer camp for demigods (on Long Island), where he learns that the father he never knew is Poseidon, God of the Sea. Soon a mystery unfolds and together with his friends—one a satyr and the other the demigod daughter of Athena—Percy sets out on a quest across the United States to reach the gates of the Underworld (located in a recording studio in Hollywood) and prevent a catastrophic war between the gods. 

My review:

This is a book, in all, that grabs you and will not let go. 
I liked how the characters were described well, even the minor ones. However, the dialogue is extremely unrealistic. Riordan needs to learn how kids really speak. It made it hard for me to get the sense of what the characters were really like when they were saying things that maybe a grown man say. Same goes for the narrative voice. Percy is in 6th grade, and narrated like again, a grown man. However, kudos to Riordan for creating a main character I don't deeply despise. Percy was very relatable. Except for the fact that he slays monsters, which brings me to another thing. The fact that a 6th grader with no training can kill so many monsters is absolutely mind-boggling. And not in a good way. I liked Percy, but I did not like the things Rick Riordan made him do. 
The plot was mostly creative, besides that it was a total rip-off of Harry Potter. 

In all, it was a pretty good book. I would recommend it to anyone who likes Greek mythology.

And that you for reading that! Please comment or whatever you humanoids do. Also, please do me the favor of having an absolutely fantabulous amazing perfect day!



  1. I really enjoyed this one too, though I've managed to miss the subsequent sequels.

  2. You make interesting points about the dialog and the realism of the narration. I read the Lightning Thief as an adult and didn't pay attention to the fact that Percy isn't a realistic 6th grader (is that really how old he's supposed to be??). I thought he was significantly older. I found the series enjoyable, but I haven't gotten into any of Riordan's subsequent series.

  3. I loved this book. Interesting take on the dialogue. Thanks for your post.